Another Reason Women Are Needed in Writers Rooms

Warning: this post contains spoilers for Netflix’s Living With Yourself, and is discussing the cliffhanger moment of the season. 

I like Paul Rudd. From my first exposure to him as Mike Hannigen (#FriendsFanForLife), to his classic comedy roles, and his surprise superhero turn in Ant Man, Paul Rudd never disappoints me. I was very excited when I heard Netflix was making a show starring Paul Rudd, and that he was playing two characters.

So before I dive into my critiques, let me just state: I really liked this show. I thought it was smart, clever, funny, charming. I thought how it was structured was really interesting and engaging. I had no problem binging this show. I think there is a lot to dig into about the commentary on depression and relationships and purpose and happiness. I could write multiple blog posts diving into the themes of this show. This show hooked me and sold me.

Until the last five minutes.

Let me explain.

It is my understanding that the shows timeline works something like this:
-The day Miles goes to have himself unknowingly cloned is the same day that his wife Kate gets her period (which is an emotional moment for her because she is trying to get pregnant).
-Miles hides that he has a clone from Kate for about a week. Miles and Kate have intercourse during this time.
-A few days pass where Miles, Clone Miles, and Kate interact but are not sure what to do.
-Kate goes to a conference for 5 days, and Clone Miles joins her for part of it. Clone Miles and Kate have intercourse during this time.
-The day Kate gets back from her conference she discovers she is pregnant.
-All of this takes place in roughly two-three weeks.

The cliffhanger of the season is that Kate announces to both of the Miles’ that she is pregnant and does not know who the father is.

Do you see my problem yet?

For those that don’t let me explain a few things about biology. Most likely you have heard that women have periods roughly once a month. This is called menstruation. But women have a whole menstrual cycle. This cycle has two major milestones: menstruation and ovulation. Menstruation is when women are bleeding, and ovulation is when women can get pregnant.

Pre-Ovulation can last for up to two weeks. Ovulation lasts for a few days, and during this time you are most likely to get pregnant. Peak ovulation is roughly 2-4 days. Semen can also live outside the body for up to five days. So if you are having unprotected sex, anytime during your pre-ovulation to ovulation window you run the chance of getting pregnant, but peak ovulation is when you are most likely to get pregnant.

Once pregnant, it can take a couple of weeks before pregnancy is detectable. Most women don’t realize they are pregnant for roughly 4 weeks. But even women who are trying to get pregnant and are testing regularly need to be pregnant for at least a week before it is detectable.

So now are you seeing my issue here?

While it is possible that Kate is pregnant, the chances that she would know that yet are incredibly unlikely. The timeline logistics for this cliffhanger make absolutely no sense.

And had a woman been in the writers room when this plot was being formed she would have known that straight away.

Again, I enjoyed this show. But a glaring plot issue like this is enough to throw me out of it. Especially when a glaring plot issue like this is also a major indicator that women were not involved enough in the conception of this show. A major misunderstanding of female biology has lead to a plot hole. A major under valuing of women has lead to a plot hole.

For me, this isn’t just a “Oh haha what a silly mistake”. This is a case and point that men don’t understand the lives of women, and aren’t willing to engage or consult women to get it right. When women are involved in the writing and development of stories, the stories portray women more accurately and more authentically. When women are not involved, the story comes across as lazy.

 

-Darci

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